Q: My picture was shot in the Caribbean, but the water is far from Caribbean blue. What can I do in Lightroom to help it? <br> A: One of my favorite techniques to adjust water color is by sliding around in the Hue Saturation and Luminance (HSL) panel in the Develop module of Lightroom.Underwater,Photography,Tutorials,Lightroom,Photoshop,Adobe,Imaging,Training,Erin

Go Ask Erin - Dial-A-Blue - Lightroom Tutorial

Q: My picture was shot in the Caribbean, but the water is far from Caribbean blue. What can I do in Lightroom to help it?A: One of my favorite techniques to adjust water color is by sliding around in the Hue Saturation and Luminance (HSL) panel in the Develop module of Lightroom. I attribute the phrase "dial-a-blue" to Berkley White, shooter extraordinaire and owner of Backscatter Underwater Video & Photo. I first heard Berk use the phrase to describe a specific shooting technique, but I've since discovered many cool ways to also dial-a-blue during the editing process. In this tutorial, I make use of the massively powerful Hue Saturation and Luminance (HSL) Panel in Lightroom 5 to dial in the color of the water. It's important to remember that even though each slider in the HSL Panel represents a single color, they are still making global (whole image) adjustments. If you move a blue slider, it affects everything blue in your shot, including blue fish, blue coral, your buddy's blue fins...you get the picture. Watch the Quick Fix VideoSoftware Covered in this Video:Topic Time Codes00:42 The Hue Saturation and Luminance Panel 00:56 Hue definition and use 01:10 Saturation definition and use 01:26 Luminance definition and use 02:05 Intro to the Targeted Adjustment Tool (TAT) 02:26 Using the TAT in the Hue tab 02:51 Adjusting multiple colors simultaneously 03:10 Using the TAT in the Saturation tab03:26 Using the TAT in the Luminance tab03:35 Before and After03:40 Side-by-side comparison of before and afterView Before and After of the Image Click Here to Begin!GoAskErin, is a feature brought to you by Backscatter - Underwater Photo and Video. Erin Quigley, our Lightroom and Photoshop guru, reveals her favorite tips and techniques in our bi-monthly series of online video tutorials, using images chosen from viewer submissions. Erin Quigley is a Adobe ACE certified digital imaging consultant specializing in customized workflows and editing strategies using Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom. She is an award-winning underwater photographer and video editor, and creator of GoAskErin.com, which provides one-on-one instruction, custom video tutorials, and Photoshop and Lightroom resources specifically developed for underwater shooters.


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